Tag Archives: Lee Loughridge

Freeze Frame 1/22/2016

From I Hate Fairyland #4 by Ryan Ottley
From I Hate Fairyland #4 by Ryan Ottley

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Indubitable Issues and Pull List (01/20/16)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 

 

 Dean’s Recommendation…

TokyoGhostTokyo Ghost #5

“The story has really picked up over the last few issues. Will the work Debbie put in to get her man back pay off or will his recent fix be the end of him?”
 
 

 

Continue reading Indubitable Issues and Pull List (01/20/16)

Indubitable Issues and Pull List (11/11/15)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Alex’s Recommendations: 
Rebels #8
“These asides have been just as good or better than the main storyline. Great narrative from a fascinating time in history.”
 
 
 
 
Alex’s Recommendations: 
Goddamned #1
“Sometimes all it takes is a writer. Sometimes you get so much more.”
 
 
 
 

Continue reading Indubitable Issues and Pull List (11/11/15)

Freeze Frame 10/23/2015

From Weird World #5 by Mike Del Mundo& Marco D'Alfonso
From Weird World #5 by Mike Del Mundo& Marco D’Alfonso

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Freeze Frame 9/25/2015

From Power Cubed #1 by Aaron Lopestri & Hi-Fi Design
From Power Cubed #1 by Aaron Lopestri & Hi-Fi Design

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Freeze Frame 9/11/2015

From Giant Size Little Marvel AvsX #4 by Skottie Young & Jean Francois Bealieu
From Giant Size Little Marvel AvsX #4 by Skottie Young & Jean Francois Bealieu

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Freeze Frame 8/28/2015

From Ragnarok #6 by Walt Simonson & Laura Martin
From Ragnarok #6 by Walt Simonson & Laura Martin

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Freeze Frame 8/21/2015

From Birthright #10 by Andrei Bressan & Andriano Lucas
From Birthright #10 by Andrei Bressan & Andriano Lucas

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Twinterview with the Vampire: Ales Kot Describes Wolf

At Nothing But Comics, we love reading comics written by Ales Kot. Whether its Zero, Material, The Surface, or Bucky Barnes: The Winter Soldier, Kot’s comics are always original, entertaining, and thought-provoking.

So when we learned that Kot is writing a new Image Comics series called Wolf with artist Matt Taylor and colorist Lee Loughridge, we dispatched our vampire correspondent Vlad to ask Kot about the comic.

Continue reading Twinterview with the Vampire: Ales Kot Describes Wolf

Review of Batman #44

Batman 44 Jockby Scott Snyder, Brian Azzarello, Jock & Lee Loughridge

What’s Batman’s greatest single issue? Could you pick one with any authority after there has been well over a thousand single issue stories about the character. What’s the most important? What does that even mean?

“I’m not the bad guy here, I’m just here”

Issue #44 of Batman is a brilliant one shot story where guest creators Jock, Lee Louthridge & Brian Azzerello join forces with series writer Scott Snyder and explores the disenfranchisement of African Americans in the United States of America. This is a crazy idea; we’ve seen attempts at this by all white creative teams this year that have failed miserably and by doing so on the highest selling comic in the industry, everyone involved is taking a huge risk with a readership that has the potential to be anywhere from completely indifferent to aggressively hostile towards the issues message. But not only do  Snyder, Azzarello, Jock & Loughridge nail the delicate balance of humanism & blunt reality; they create one of the most heartfelt, thoughtful and satisfying single issue of comics in the last five years.

Batman #44 is about a black male teenager found dead with bullet wounds and having fell thousands of feet to his death in the swamp land outside Gotham City. What follows is an engrossing mystery where Batman discovers the tragic combination of circumstances and mitigating factors that ultimately lead to the boys death. The allegory wanes between subtle to beating you over the head, but it’s always effective and striking. When Snyder & Azzarello include a newspaper clipping about how African Americans faced housing discrimination in Long Island, what they are trying to tell the reader is readily apparent, but also entirely necessary at this moment in American history. Jock & Loughridge render the narrative beautifully in a free flowing style that accentuate the contrast of Jock’s art style between his rough and sharp lines and it adds to the somber aesthetic of the story and it’s very sobering idea. Perhaps best of all is how they manage to cut to the heart of the issue by using a handful of common Batman characters. It resist giving an easy answer but instead give’s the right one, that being that racism is truly systemic of society and while that technically means it’s no one persons fault,  it’s also the fault of everyone that engages with that system. But most importantly, it shows a practical way to change it and that in itself is a wonderful thing.

“The whole city. Everyone and no one. But above all, the one to catch was the boy who fell”

I can’t stress enough how amazing it is to see these ideas in this book. This is a fucking Batman comic, this is the highest selling comic in the industry month in and month out. It’s one thing to say these things in a small press book, it’s another to do it with an comic from Image or Boom!, it’s another to do it with a Milestone Media series, but to do on this Batman comic, at this point in the books relevance and at this point in our history is something truly special. I don’t know if this is the best Batman comic I’ve ever read, there’s a long list of single issues by the likes of Frank Miller, Grant Morrison, Jim Starlin, Neal Adams, Steve Englehart, Norm Breyfogle ect that it’s bumping up against. But I can say without a doubt that it’s the most important single issue of a Batman comic that I can think of. I’ve always resisted saying Snyder was one of the all time great Batman writers, not because I didn’t like his work on the title; I’ve loved it. But it’s hard to consider it’s context within the decades of stories written about the iconic character. At this point, with this issue, in the context of everything Snyder has done on the series along with all his work on Detective Comics prior, his unique and singular excellence on the character is undeniable. With Brian Azzarello, Jock & Lee Loughridge; Snyder has done something truly special with issue #44 of Batman. And while the writer has become truly fearless in his time on the title, this is his greatest risk yet and he pulls it off flawlessly.