Tag Archives: Rocket Raccoon

Freeze Frame 5/8/2015

From We Can Never Go Home #2 by Joshua Hood
From We Can Never Go Home #2 by Joshua Hood.

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2015 Eisner Award Nominations

Pax Americana
Nominees below. Details via Comic-Con.org

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Freeze Frame 4/3/2015

From Avengers: Rage Of Ultron by Jerome Opena
From Avengers: Rage Of Ultron by Jerome Opena

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This Week’s Finest: Rocket Raccoon #7

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Skottie Young

By Skottie Young & Filipe Andrade

When this series was first announced there were some doubts whether Rocket could support his own on-going book. There had been that series in the 80s, but it was only a limited one. Besides, it didn’t really sell that well anyway. (It is brilliant though, and highly recommended). Sure, the furry refugee from a black hole somewhere in Sirius Major had achieved new heights of popularity, yet it was as a team player. Could he hold down a solo title? The answer: oh definitely yes.
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Review of Rocket Raccoon #1

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Skottie Young

Rocket Raccoon #1 by Skottie Young

I went into this issue kind of blind. My main reason for buying it was the character. As a big fan of the DnA Guardians of the Galaxy era, I am fond of Rocket. Plus, I always enjoy some Skottie Young art. Skottie Young the writer, however, I had no prior experience with. Also, I shall confess, I was a little unsure about how well Rocket could hold down an ongoing monthly book. He is great in a team setting, but would he wear out his welcome in a solo environment? Well, based on the first issue, my concerns were unfounded.

Young begins the book with Rocket sneaking into a space ship. The first dialogue in the story involves two guards debating the believability of a show based around a living planet. As with other instances of humor throughout the issue, none of jokes feel forced or arch. Indeed, there is an easy-going rhythm to the story, which is reflected in the art as well. Young is obviously enjoying himself, populating the issue with whimsical asides and light-hearted action. This is the most fun comic I have read so far this week. It is also lovingly crafted art-wise. As to be expected, Young fills the pages with imaginative detail and priceless facial expressions.

Finally, and most importantly, Young has a great handle on Rocket’s personality. Having given up on Bendis’ Guardians book after a few issues, I am happy to have at least one way I can still enjoy part of the team. Actually, the Guardians do cameo in this book which leaves me wanting to see Young do more with them as well. The conversation between Rocket and Star-Lord is particularly delightful. (Bonus points to Young for coming closer than anyone else in making Angela not look like the embarrassment that she is. Maybe it has something to do with keeping her blurry and in the background?).

Overall, a fantastic first issue. I’m looking forward to seeing what happens next . . .

Cheers.