New York Comic Con News & Things 10/8/2017

There is a flurry of announcements coming out New York Comic Con, this is some of the news that’s been revealed so far from the one of the worlds largest comics convention

  • Scott Snyder & Sean Murphy of The Wake & American Vampire: Survival of The Fittest are teaming up again for a new post apocalyptic Batman series titled Batman: Last Night. In addition to the creative talent involved, the book is notable for it being Scott Snyder’s last Batman comic, and Sean Murphy’s last comic with a writing collaborator
  • Robert Kirkman will be launching a new science fiction series through his Image Comics based Skybound imprint titled Oblivion Song with new comer artist Lorenzo De Felici
  • Singer/song writer The Weeknd will be publishing a new comics series titled Starboy though Marvel, based off the artists previous album
  • Writer Steve Orlando (Justice League of America, Midnighter, Supergirl) will team with artist Ryan Sook (Seven Soldiers: Zatanna, X-Factor,  Arkham Asylum: Living Hell) for a new ongoing series spinning out of Dark Nights: Metal titled The Unexpected, that the writer describes as “Dark Tower meets Seven Samurai.”
  • Details were revealed for the Milestone Media relaunch. Denny Cowans, Reginald Hudlin & Derek Dingle will be the primary creators directing the overarching stories while contributing writing and art for several titles. Other creators involved include Bill Sienkewicz, Greg Pak, Kyle Baker, Ken Lashley & more.
  • Marvel will be launching two new X-Men series; Rouge & Gambit with writing by Kelly Thompson (Hawkeye, Captain Phasma) and art from Pere Perez (Archer & Armstrong, Faith) along with Legion written by Peter Milligan (Hellblazer, X-Static) with art from Wilfredo Torres (Jupiters Circle, Moon Knight)
  • The additional creative teams have been announced for the Young Animal/DC Comics “Milk Wars” crossover. In addition to the previously announced Justice League/Doom Patrol crossover by Gerard Way, Steve Orlando & ACO; Shade/Wonder Woman will be written by Shade, The Changing Girl writer Cecil Castallucci with art from Mirka Andolfo (DC Bombshells, Wonder Woman) Mother Panic/Batman by series writer Jody Houser with art by Ty Templeton (The Adventures of Batman & Robin, Justice League Unlimited) and Cave Carson/Swamp Thing from series co-writer Jon Rivera with art from Langdon Foss (The Surface, Vote Loki) The crossover will be released weekly in January of 2018
  • IDW will be releasing a new comics series titled Star Wars: Forced of Destiny based on the web series with contributions by Jody Houser, Elsa Charretier, Delilah S. Dawson, Devin Grayson & more. The series will also include animation cell variant covers from artist Annie Wu
  • Additional News: Marvel will be releasing two new digital first series about Black Panther’s titled Black Panther: Long Live The King written by  Hugo award winning novelist Nnedi Okorafor with art from Andre Lima Arujo (Generations Gone, Avengers A.I) & Rise of The Back Panther written by former (excellent) comics critic Evan Narcisse, Marvel has another new series titled Weapon H spinning out of Totally Awesome Hulk, IDW will be launch a Big Hero 6 comic based off the animated film, Bleeding Cool is reporting that Scott Snyder will be collaborating with Grant Morrison for an addition Dark Nights Metal spin-off series,  Marvel was releasing a crossover comic with weapons manufacturer Northrup Gumman but was then cancelled due to controversy
  • Trailers!!!!!

Justice League

Runaways

Thor Ragnarok Hella feature

Pacific Rim Uprising

 

 

17 thoughts on “New York Comic Con News & Things 10/8/2017”

  1. Upcoming comics series that I WISH had been announced at NYCC’17: 

    CLOWN KITCHEN— writer Anthony Bourdain (ANTHONY BOURDAIN: PARTS UNKNOWN) and Sean Gordon Murphy (PUNK ROCK JESUS) explore what happens when Batman villain the Joker is allowed to produce a reality TV cooking show as part of his therapy at Arkham Asylum. 

    HOUSE OF MYSTERY — writer Bill Willingham (FABLES) and artist Mark Buckingham (FABLES) team-up Detective Chimp with different DC Comics detectives (Elongated Man, Angel and the Ape, Jonny Double, etc.) each month in this six-issue limited series to solve the mystery of who killed Space Cabby (SPOILER ALERT — it was Dr. Manhattan).

    SPACE CABBY — spinning off from the jaw-dropping conclusion to HOUSE OF MYSTERY (SPOILER ALERT — Space Cabby is resurrected from the dead by the Phantom Stranger), writer Tom King (THE OMEGA MEN, BATMAN) teams up with artist Goran Parlov (STARLIGHT) to show readers what happens when you hire a great creative team to produce the adventures of an obscure DC Comics character. 

    RONIN — writer Geoff Johns (FOREVER EVIL) turns his attention to another iconic 80s comics series, Frank Miller’s RONIN. With artist Gary Frank (SUPREME POWER), Johns picks up the story ten years after the events depicted in RONIN, to explore what happens to the protagonists of the series (SPOILER ALERT — Dr. Manhattan kills them all).

      1. Here’s another series that I “wish” would have been announced:

        R. L. STINE PRESENTS TALES OF THE BLACK FREIGHTER — inspired by the fictional comic in the iconic WATCHMEN series, DC Comics pays writer R. L. Stine a huge amount of money to put his name on an all-ages horror pirate comics anthology series curated by some of DC’s finest assistant editors, with stories produced by new creative talent that might be really good at telling a story one day.

  2. From the private journal of Geoff Johns:

    October 8, 2017

    NYCC was a success. I had my fears that the “creator rights” crowd would throw a fit about Doomsday Clock (so much so that on Thursday I dreamed that Red Lantern Zilius Zox — who had the face and beard of Alan Moore — was eating me alive). But no, they saw Gary’s first six pages and all anybody could talk about was “Is it really Rorschach?”

    No, Marvel got all the crap at the con for doing a promotional STEM comic with Northrup Grumman, for doing business with a “war profiteer.” (Thankfully, nobody gave DC crap for doing a promotional comic with “chicken abuser” KFC a while back. Dodged a bullet there.) 

    Everybody seemed really accepting of my claim that Doomsday Clock was some creative statement on how Watchmen impacted comics with “darker themes” — suckers! I mean, really, if they were paying attention to my other work, they’d no I have no problem with “darker themes.” It’s not like you will ever find Hoppy the Marvel Bunny in one of my Shazam comics. 

    Not to sound like Larfleeze, but I am going to make enough coin off the royalties on this project to buy that jade Green Lantern ring prop replica that I’ve been wanting for a long time. 

    And best of all, nobody suspects that the real villain of Doomsday Clock is going to be Promethea!

    1. “so much so that on Thursday I dreamed that Red Lantern Zilius Zox — who had the face and beard of Alan Moore — was eating me alive” 🤣🤣🤣

  3. Did anyone read the preview pages of Doomsday Clock that DC released? They were pretty bad. Really leaden prose. I have zero excitement for this Event . . .

    1. A lot of the first six pages are an armageddon info dump from various news sources to show just how bad things have gotten, an obvious commentary on the current, constant real-world barrage of bad news in the time it takes to read nine panels. I expected the last panel on page four to be solid black, with the words “DARKSEID IS” written in white letters.

      I think one of the brilliant things about WATCHEMEN’s construction is that its ending challenges readers to imagine what happens next – does Viedt pull it off and trick the world into a lasting peace, or is Rorschach’s journal discovered and does it all unravel? Does Robert Redford get elected president?

      John’s Doomsday Clock takes that challenge away, and shows us DC’s vision for how the story turns out based on John’s current apprehensions and DC’s commercial hopes.

      1. Yes, one of the strongest reasons for Watchmen’s lasting resonances is its ambiguity. Does Viedt succeed? Was Rorschach’s idealism praiseworthy or foolish? In the grand scheme of the cosmos does any of this matter or should we simply hold on tight to our little scraps of personal happiness? These questions are eternal which gives Watchmen its power beyond the specific cultural moment in which it was created.

        My objection to the politics isn’t their inclusion (obviously Moore’s original story is quite political) but how they’re employed. My problem with the politics in the info dump is how haphazard they seem, as if Johns was simply trying to graft 2017 American onto Moore’s imaginary version of the 80s. Moore created a timeline that, while recognizable, varied significantly from historical fact. Instead of taking the time to think through how the events of Moore’s story would alter future events, Johns seems more interested in scoring easy political points. Now this is only a brief preview, so more nuance could be coming, but, for me, it isn’t promising . . .

        1. Speaking of altered timelines, I noticed that they had William F. Buckley, Jr. as a newscaster in the six page preview. I thought the imagery was poor (Buckley looked like a young 1960s Buckley, but not an older 1990s Buckley) and I thought it uncharacteristic and unfair that he would be portrayed as a state news propagandist. (People may not agree with his politics, but I hope they acknowledge that he was a principled proponent of his politics, willing to engage respectfully with those who disagreed with him – Gore Vidal aside).

          It was if Johns wanted an iconic conservative to be the face of the crappy world he was conveying, and picked Buckley without consideration of the man’s character. I think a 30 year old Sean Hannity would have done just fine.

          1. Yes, the Buckley cameo also struck me as odd. And this is my problem with the politics: they are not organically woven into the narrative, so that as soon as they pop up, I’m immediately taken out of the story. Dramatic moment ruined.

            Also, simply lazy writing on Johns’ part.

        2. Couple of other random things here:
          When I think of “modern artist that can approximate Watchmen” Gary Frank is about as close to the bottom as you can get.

          I love how Johns is like “Were going to do a nine panel grid for all of it, with exceptions” and then you see them veer away from it within the preview pages.

          I suppose the Time Magazine writer that was acting as Johns counter on the panel, and the guy who put Watchmen in the 100 greatest books of all time or whatever back in the 1980’s, has no context for the optics of this in terms of creator rights or just doesn’t care. Either way, he’s pretty suspect based on this

          “I know Alan Moore won’t read this..” no shit dude. Maybe if you addressed why that is and why you choose to do this comic anyway I’d respect it a little bit more, but from my vantage point, this is a writer with executive power that’s leveraging that, & his goodwill from fans for Rebirth among other things, to basically use someone else’s creations in spite of them being vehemently against that.

          What’s the great conclusion that this book will come to that will make any of this worth it? Just the balance of negative and positive portrayals of superhero’s is really not enough to justify a twelve issue series in itself, especially one with this baggage.

          I lost a little respect for Tom King for the way he’s been pumping this book up on Twitter. I guess as someone who’s listed Johns as one of his primary influences, I get the excitement, but I’d expect a bit more understanding from him on the implications of this with creator rights & ownership in comics on his part

          1. Random pet peeve: I hate it when people refer to Watchmen as a graphic novel. No, it’s a 12 issue mini(OK maxi)-series. True, at this point the vast majority of readers (myself included) have only experienced it in collected form, just as no one reads a Dostoevsky novel in its original serialized form anymore. Still, as you say, some context would be great . . .

            I agree: “Alan Moore won’t approve” is a cop-out. It could be brilliant and Alan Moore still won’t approve, so it’s a pretty meaningless measuring stick. I mean the guy doesn’t even want his name on the series he did write . . .

            My view is the same as it has all along: Watchmen should not be a sacred cow. If a creative team truly has a fresh take on the characters which adds to their legacy, let them at it. However, such projects should be approached with caution and done sparingly. It’s all in the execution and I have little faith in this creative team adding anything worth-wild to the mythos of Watchmen.

            (Oh and in case anyone has been wondering, swap out Johns for Snyder and you have my sentiments on Dream appearing in Metal).

            To give King the benefit of the doubt, maybe he’s simply being a fanboy and letting his excitement for the idea get the better of him?

            1. While I agree a trade collection of SUPERMAN REBIRTH issues 5 through 10 should not be labelled a graphic novel, I think the designation of WATCHMEN as a graphic novel (in the sense that it was envisioned and executed as a complete, literary story by the creative team) is appropriate, despite its initial serialization at a time when major comics publishers were not publishing non-serialized comics.

              If some fans want to create a non-profit bootleg WATCHMEN sequel comic (or if a professional creative team wants to comment on the series through parody or pastiche), that’s their business, but a DC corporate executive who makes plenty of money from his salary and red lantern ring royalties creating and pushing this book with no significant acknowledgement of the historic context and controversy is distasteful.

              And I do find it troublesome that a fan community that was morally outraged about a promotional comic (paid for by a corporation legally providing weapons for the defense of the Republic) quickly rallied to kill a comic that few were likely to read, but seems mostly indifferent to the ethics of producing a comic like DOOMSDAY CLOCK.

              1. “If some fans want to create a non-profit bootleg WATCHMEN sequel comic (or if a professional creative team wants to comment on the series through parody or pastiche), that’s their business, but a DC corporate executive who makes plenty of money from his salary and red lantern ring royalties creating and pushing this book with no significant acknowledgement of the historic context and controversy is distasteful.”
                Yes, yes, yes 100%

                “And I do find it troublesome that a fan community that was morally outraged about a promotional comic (paid for by a corporation legally providing weapons for the defense of the Republic) quickly rallied to kill a comic that few were likely to read, but seems mostly indifferent to the ethics of producing a comic like DOOMSDAY CLOCK”
                Marvel is in such a weird place right now. The fact that Ike Perlmuitter is still standing with the president when the majority of CEO’s affiliated with his presidency have backed away is fucking weird and makes it very clear for myself where I stand on supporting their comics. That being said, they’ve basically gotten the ass end of the culture wars in comics, with both readers on the left criticizing them for having what’s amounted to the perception of somewhat hollow progressivism, and fans on the right that think they are way too progressive. With all that being said, had they still had comics from the likes of Hickman, Opena, Fraction, Ellis, Brubaker etc, this would all probably be a moot point as those creators built in audience’s combined with over arching fan interest and buzz from that tended to be a driving force for a lot of successful Marvel series in years past in spite of any controversy. But I see some of these books that Marvel is releasing, with the creative teams that are being promoted, and especially some of the artists that are working on the smaller books or following up on titles second or third arc, & I just don’t see a lot to be excited about personally. I’m really happy for Matthew Rosenberg and that he’s getting a real opportunity there, I think it’s awesome that Ta-Nehisi Coates seems to be expanding his imprint at the publisher both with the books he doing, in addition to the writers he’s bringing on to work on Black Panther related projects, and there is still plenty of other cool talents there ala David Walker, Christian Ward, Marco Rudy, Stuart Immonem, Kelly Thompson etc It’s just as a whole, it really doesn’t feel like it’s working right now for who they have creating comics for them, and the execution. I think it’s difficult to pin-point why that is beyond the typical anti-diversity ranting’s of nerdom’s far right. In other words, they are basically at the ass end of all this as of now.

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