Tag Archives: Fight Club

Freeze Frame 10/30/2015

From Robin Son Of Batman #5 by Patrick Gleason & John Kalisz
From Robin Son Of Batman #5 by Patrick Gleason & John Kalisz

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Freeze Frame 9/25/2015

From Power Cubed #1 by Aaron Lopestri & Hi-Fi Design
From Power Cubed #1 by Aaron Lopestri & Hi-Fi Design

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Freeze Frame 8/28/2015

From Ragnarok #6 by Walt Simonson & Laura Martin
From Ragnarok #6 by Walt Simonson & Laura Martin

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Freeze Frame 7/24/2015

From Wolf #1 by Matt Taylor
From Wolf #1 by Matt Taylor

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This Week’s Finest: Fight Club 2 #3

FightClubIssue3Cover

by Chuck Palahniuk, Cameron Stewart, Dave Stewart, David Mack

The first rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club. Third rule of Fight Club: Someone yells stop, goes limp, taps out, the fight is over. Fourth rule: only two guys to a fight. Fifth rule: one fight at a time, fellas. Sixth rule: no shirts, no shoes. Seventh rule: Fights will go on as long as they have to. And the eighth and final rule: If this is your first night at Fight Club, you have to fight.

This week, instead of going with a pick for the story,art, or fan-service, I chose something that spoke to me personally. Of course, it also had great art and fan-service.

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Freeze Frame 6/26/2015

From Annihilator #6 by Frazier Irving
From Annihilator #6 by Frazer Irving

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Freeze Frame 5/29/2015

From Fight Club 2 #1 by Cameron Stewart
From Fight Club 2 #1 by Cameron Stewart

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Son Of The Devil & Fight Club 2 Advanced Reviews

Don’t forget that in addition to Cosmo’s review of Divinity #4 we have advanced reviews of Son Of The Devil #1 by Brian Buccellato & Tony Infante as well as Fight Club 2 #1 by Chuck Palahnuick & Cameron Stewart. Click on the images below to read more.

Sons of the Devil 1
Click to read the review by Alex
Click to read the review by Josh
Click to read the review by Josh

 

Fight Club 2 #6 Review

cBy Chuck Palahniuk, Cameron Stewart, Dave Stewart, Nate Piekos, David Mack

Flashbacks. Non-linear storytelling. Fake outs. This book has them all. Does it make a good comic?

Surprisingly, yes. The plot shuffles forward slightly in rewinding a full 12 hours in story time for the Sebastien subplot, but manages to raise the tension between him and Tyler.

During Tyler’s last psych visit, he went to sleep and Sebastien woke up. Dr.Wrong then turned on Tyler and convinced Sebastien to mount a rescue mission for his son while trying to explain what Tyler actually is. It is something that Chuck Palahnuik already hinted at when the book was announced, but is still hard to explain. Tyler is a concept (hereditary no less), that possess a person to try to conquer the world. His main goal is to move from Sebastien to his son as it has been one of his primary objectives since the events of Fight Club concluded. Meanwhile, Marla and her friend Chloe, the terminally ill woman who wanted to get laid, plan to escape the war-torn country they’re trapped in as well as track down her missing son.

Stewart does some great storytelling in this issue, letting the art sell the story. It flows very nicely, even if the story is jumping locations and eras. His rendering of the JFK assassination is certainly one of the most memorable ones in comics, as well as the painted film cells that run across some of the early pages. His use of the both a conventional grid and broken panel structure keep the visuals fresh and the reader moving through the book. Dave Stewart’s colors are of course on point and go from the subdued mundane palette in the real world with splashes of vibrant color where possible.

Overall, it may not seem like an important issue but I enjoyed it nonetheless. It adds textual layers to the story and raises the stakes, even if it steals a beat or three from other popular films. This series seems at its best when it takes the less dramatic action bits and make them the focus of the issue instead of the fleeting moments.

Rating: Poor, Fair, Good, Great, Excellent

This comic was provided to Nothing But Comics by the publisher Dark Horse Comics for free without any payment between the site or publisher or agreement on the reviews content.