Tag Archives: Tommy Lee Edwards

Freeze Frame 2/17/2017

From Dark Horse Presents #31 by Tim Hamilton
From Dark Horse Presents #31 by Tim Hamilton

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Uncovering the Best Covers, 2-15-17

Want to know what covers caught our attention this week?

Curious what our eyes fell in love with at first sight?

Well, here they are, the most memorable images on the stands this Wednesday . . .

Cosmo feels a chill from . . .

dark-horse-presents-31-carla-speed-mcneil
Dark Horse Presents #31 by Carla Speed McNeil

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Indubitable Issues and Pull List (02/15/17)

LOOKING FOR BOOKS TO BUY THIS WEEK?  

LOOK NO FURTHER.  

HERE ARE SOME ISSUES THAT WILL NOT DISAPPOINT.

 
Tyler’s Recommendation…
wildstorm1Wild Storm #1
“Warren Ellis returns to the Wildstorm universe! I’m of the mind that any new Ellis book is worthy of my time, so I’m excited for this. I very much enjoyed his previous run on Stormwatch, and his work as of late has been fantastic, I would advise any curious minds to grab a copy of this on Wednesday
 

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Freeze Frame 1/6/2017

From Shutter #25 by Leila Del Duca & Owen Gieni
From Shutter #25 by Leila Del Duca & Owen Gieni

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Podcast Episode Forty Two

This could be U.S but you playing
This could be U.S but you playing

The guys process the US election results together and read poignant quotes from activist film maker Michael Moore & NBA head coaches Steve Kerr, Stan Van Gundy & Greg Poppovich. Pat proposes that Poppovich run for president in 2020 on the democratic ticket which was also proposed by Jade Wilson on the True Hoop podcast last Friday. Could we be on to something? The guys also talk some comics as that’s what they do, specifically all new series debut’s from the week. Debut’s like Mother Panic, Avengers 1.1, World of Wakanda, Violent Love & Namesake. Plus, the usual inanities

Freeze Frame 11/11/2016

From New Superman #5 by Viktor Bogdanovich, Richard Friend & Hi-FI
From New Superman #5 by Viktor Bogdanovich, Richard Friend & Hi-FI

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Freeze Frame 12/18/2015

From Superman American Alien #2 by Tommy Lee Edwards
From Superman American Alien #2 by Tommy Lee Edwards

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Review of Mother Panic #1

mother-panic-1-tommy-lee-edwards
Tommy Lee Edwards

By Jody Houser, Jim Krueger, Tommy Lee Edwards, Phil Hester & Trish Mulvihill

After three reboots of pre-existing concepts, Gerard Way’s new Young Animal imprint unveils its first original character: Mother Panic. The debut issue of her adventures is an intriguing hybrid which mixes new ideas with familiar tropes. Protagonist Violet Paige is introduced lounging on her private jet as it approaches Gotham City’s airport. She downs a glass of wine as an unidentified companion warns Violet of overexerting herself. The context is vague, leaving the reader unclear what sort of destructive tendencies the aide is referring. Violet immediately conveys the spoiled apathy of the privileged, flipping off the paparazzi greeting her at the airport with questions about the latest gossip. Internally, Violet muses about this corrupt city to which she keeps returning. Perhaps she should simply burn it to the ground and be done with it all. Still, for all that cynicism, she remains capable of brightening a stranger’s day. When she glimpses two fans timing their selfie for the moment Violet will pass in the background, Violet offers a sly grin for their camera. In the course of these initial two pages, writer Jody Houser successfully introduces these multiple aspects to Violet’s personality, immediately drawing the reader into Violet’s story.

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Superman American Alien #2 Review

cby Max Landis, Tommy Lee Edwards, John Workman, Ryan Sook

Max Landis is one of the biggest Superman fans around, and a terrific writer to boot (having written the screenplay to Chronicle and the silent Kyrptonite-Man chapter in Action Comics Annual #1). His video on Superman’s death “breaking comics” is one of my favorite critiques on modern comics. In short, Max Landis needs to write Superman. So few people have an understanding, much less appreciation for the character these days and part of that is the lack of compelling monthly stories that other heroes enjoy.

Superman American Alien is basically, Superman in the a “real world” context. One part Superman: Secret Identity and one part Man of Steel, its about a Clark Kent that feels more human. He can bleed, he can get angry and he can get scared. Of course we’ve seen all this from Superman stories before, but together all at once the [;pt really has to call for them otherwise they make the story meaningless.

Clark Kent appears to be an average awkward teen, having a burgeoning romance with Lana Lang and friendship with Pete Ross. The quiet life of Smallville is shattered when a trio of angry youths begins shooting the town folk. Clark tries to avoid intervening, but eventually has to in order to save a family of innocents. His methods border on extreme, but the violent trio is alive to be arrested by police. The story ends with Clark promising his mother he will never do that kind of thing again.

The art by Tommy Lee Edwards has a nice sketchy, illustration quality to his style. It’s rough but feels vaguely genuine, as though he sketched all of this in minutes from watching it in real life. The detail he puts into the town, scenery and perspective is no less impressive than what his younger contemporaries are doing. In a way, his style reminds me of Sean Murphy with his use of line and the way he renders figures. I’ve been of fan of Edwards’ art since I read the Question miniseries he did with Mark Verheiden.

Seeing him work on a Superman story is a joy, and makes a nice complement to Landis’ script which feels both retro and modern in a weird way.

Superman American Alien #2 doesn’t hold many surprises, but its always welcome to have a good Superman comic on the shelves.

Rating: Poor, Fair, Good, Great, Excellent