Tag Archives: Russel Dauterman

Freeze Frame 10/21/2016

From Thor #12 by Russell Dauterman & Matthew Wilson
From Thor #12 by Russell Dauterman & Matthew Wilson

Continue reading Freeze Frame 10/21/2016

Freeze Frame 11/20/2015

From Ms Marvel #1 by Takeshi Miyazawa & Ian Herring
From Ms Marvel #1 by Takeshi Miyazawa & Ian Herring

Continue reading Freeze Frame 11/20/2015

Review of Cyclops #1

CYCLOPS2014001cov-118b0by Greg Rucka and Russel Dauterman

Cyclops #1 is a fantastic call to adventure that acts as a reconsideration of the character by giving him a full fledged personality that is instantly relatable and enduring. We are all too familiar with the perception of Cyclops as being at best boring and more likely a stuck up douche nozzle but this shuts all of that down within a few pages by setting up Cyclops with a full fledged personality and then sending him into a fantastic situation based around the very basic concept of a teenage boy and his father awkwardly attempting to bond with one another. It walks the tight rope of playing with Cyclops as a concept while grounding him into relatability in the way only a veteran writer like Rucka can, even managing to play a joke on the audience by having Cyclops tell a joke and then have the person he’s telling it to not get it pushing up against the idea of him being humorless. But mostly what Rucka is doing here is putting you in the shoes of a young man on the cusps of adulthood and showing how difficult that can be. Ever since he’s been reintroduced into current Marvel continuity Scott has only had the older version of himself to look at and all the adults to tell him how wrong that version is. Now he has another example in Cosair and he just happens to be the coolest possible father any kid could ask for, one that literally checks all the boxes for who Scott want’s to be when he grows up and in doing so creates a complex dichotomy for Cyclops showing what he will become and what he wants to be. Or could be? Russell Dauterman kills these pages by elevating the sense of wonder and fun in the story line as he shows Cyclops, Cosair and friends ride across the vast and beautiful universe having a blast plundering weaker ships. You can see the constant joy in Cosair and his friends from Russell’s illustration and more importantly you can see that slowly transferring to Cyclops. This is fun swash buckling space adventure that takes a character with all types of baggage and burns it away in a stroke of pure joy and wonder. Someday Cyclops will still be the difficult and flawed super human that we’ve come to know over the last five decades but for now it’s great to just have him be the wide eyed teen going off on an adventure with the super cool dad he never knew he had. He deserves a break and we are all the better for it.