Category Archives: REED IT

What if Donald Trump tweeted about comics?

The site Politico recently examined the Twitter account of businessman and U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (@realDonaldTrump) from its inception in 2009 to the present. Politico notes the significance of the account: “Today, @realDonaldTrump is a force, a newsmaker, an agitator, an American political phenomenon that combines the high profile of a presidential candidate with the reach and velocity of social media. It has more than 7.5 million followers. It has tweeted more than 31,000 times. It is a thing.”

Noting the absence of tweets from @realDonaldTrump on the topic of comics, Nothing But Comics ponders what Trump might tweet about comics, were he to take an interest.

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The Red Bee asks Cullen Bunn about his favorite Micronaut

Over the years, the Micronauts sci-fi toy line has inspired comics produced by various publishers, such as Image Comics and Devil’s Due Publishing, but most notably Marvel Comics’ Micronauts series; initially written by Bill Mantlo and illustrated by Michael Golden and Joe Rubinstein, the series ran from 1979 to 1984. The series featured heroic characters like Biotron and Acroyear fighting against the evil Baron Karza in the extradimensional Microverse.

This week, IDW Publishing releases its own Micronauts series, written by Cullen Bunn and illustrated by David Baldeon. We wanted to know Bunn’s favorite Micronauts character, so we recruited superhero the Red Bee to ask him.

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The Secret Origin of Alan Moore’s Beard

Acclaimed comics writer Alan Moore has several distinctive physical characteristics — he is over six feet tall, has long hair and a thick beard, and wears large rings on his hands. But Moore’s beard is arguably his most iconic feature; the beard is often highlighted by Moore’s caricaturists and has inspired both satire and song. But what inspired Moore to cultivate his voluminous whiskers? It turns out that the origin of Moore’s beard dates back to a challenging but eventful time in the writer’s life.

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Snyder and Capullo Announce New Creator-Owned Series ‘Totally Dark’

As writer Scott Snyder and artist Greg Capullo wrap up their acclaimed run on the DC Comics series Batman, the creative duo share the news that they are working together on a groundbreaking new creator-owned comics series that will challenge readers’ expectations of a comic book — the sci-fi horror mystery, Totally Dark.

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DECLASSIFIED: An Advance Review of DEPT. H #1

[EDITOR’S NOTE: Nothing But Comics has obtained a leaked government document regarding the incident at the Dept. H subsea facility. For obvious reasons, we are unable to disclose our source, whom we will refer to as “Dark Horse” (because it sounds cool, and because “Deep Throat” was already taken).]

DEPT H Top Secret

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Before STAR WARS, there was Howard Chaykin’s IRONWOLF

In American Comic Book Chronicles: The 1970s, contributor Dave Dykema notes that, in 1976, when Marvel Comics agreed to publish a comic book adaptation of the upcoming Star Wars movie, filmmaker George Lucas made two requests: “First, in order to maximize publicity, Marvel’s first two Star Wars issues had to be on the newsstands before the film came out. Second, Lucas wanted artist Howard Chaykin to draw the comic. Lucas liked Chaykin’s work on a 1973-74 three-issue run of DC’s Weird Worlds (#8-#10) starring science-fiction swashbuckler Ironwolf.”

Curious about the comic that inspired Lucas to request Chaykin for the Star Wars adaptation, Nothing But Comics takes a look at the Ironwolf strip presented in DC Comics’ Weird Worlds #8-#10.

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“A New Aeon of Blackness”: The Possession (and Politics) of Sonny Baskerville in ‘Promethea’

Sixteen years ago, in the pages of the comic Promethea, writer Alan Moore and artist J. H. Williams III (with inker Mick Gray, colorist Jeromy Cox, and letterer Todd Klein) satirized the American public’s desire for tough, colorful politicians and political spectacle. The creative team did so by depicting the travails of a supporting character — the demonically-possessed New York City mayor, Sonny Baskerville. Moore uses Baskerville’s possession to comment on the American public’s shallow political interests and the appeal of brash politicians.

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Why Super PACs and “Dark Money” are Bad for the Marvel Universe (and America)

Marvel Entertainment CEO Ike Perlmutter’s recent $1 million donation to a charity associated with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump sparked controversy. Some argued that this contribution from a top Marvel executive benefited a candidate whose politics did not reflect Marvel Comics’ ongoing efforts to be diverse in its content and appeal to comics readers. The controversy also generated interest in Perlmutter and his wife’s $2 million contribution to a political super PAC supporting Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio.

While the controversy focused on the politics of the candidates who benefited from Perlmutter’s contributions, one troubling aspect of these donations remains unexamined: the influence that wealthy individuals like Perlmutter can have on the U.S. election process, particularly through contributions to super PACs.

To explore this influence, just imagine that the Marvel Universe has the same U.S. campaign finance laws that we have in the real world, and let’s see how this impacts the hypothetical political activities of our favorite comics characters.

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On Flash Appreciation Day, please help comics creators in need

Today marks the ten-year anniversary of the premiere of the Justice League Unlimited episode “Flash and Substance” (February 11, 2006). In that episode, the people of Central City honor the Flash for his heroism, and declare the day of celebration “Flash Appreciation Day.” The episode inspired fans to celebrate the DC Comics superhero on February 11th each year.

It’s great that the Flash has a special day each year for fans to express their appreciation, but what’s the best way to honor a fictional superhero? Since we can’t give Flash the key to Central City, Nothing But Comics, in partnership with eight sites, is recommending that you show your appreciation for the Flash by being a hero for comics creators in need — this Flash Appreciation Day, we’re asking Flash fans to support the Hero Initiative.

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Flashback: A look at DC’s Elseworlds FLASHPOINT miniseries

“In Elseworlds, heroes are taken from their usual settings and put into strange times and places — some that have existed or might have existed, and others that can’t or shouldn’t exist. The result is stories that make characters that are as familiar as yesterday seem as fresh as tomorrow.” — Elseworlds tagline

DC Comics’ Elseworlds imprint allowed creators to present stories about the publisher’s superheroes that were set outside the characters’ established narrative continuity (for example, Batman fighting crime in Victorian Era Gotham, or in a puritanical America run by a corrupt theocratic regime). The imprint published mostly standalone graphic novels, but in 1999, the creative team of writer Pat McGreal, artist Norm Breyfogle, and colorist Noelle Giddings presented an alternate vision of superhero the Flash in an Elseworlds miniseries, the three-issue Flashpoint.

In honor of this week’s upcoming Flash Appreciation Day (February 11th), Nothing But Comics takes a look at Flashpoint and its portrayal of the Flash.

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