Tag Archives: Southern Bastards

The Haul: March 2017

Looking back on last month’s article, I came to the realization that I tend to add more books to a list than I’m actually able to read and, in may cases, afford. There are only so many hours left at the end of the day to tackle my pull list, and, while they are a passion, comic books are not my only hobby. On top of that, I’ve been reading a lot more “older” stuff lately. This list will be more realistic, conservative towards what I think I’ll actually read. If I get to more, great! I’d love to read every good book out there.

Continue reading The Haul: March 2017

The Haul: February 2017

After an almost three year hiatus (the last post came out on 4/30/14), I’ve decided to bring back my column “The Haul.” At its inception, I vowed to write something once a week. Not only did that not happen then, but I will not even pretend to make that claim again today. However, what I can promise is to pop in at least once a month for this new endeavor. When “The Haul” first debuted, it was meant as a place where I could talk about whatever was on my mind that week in the world of comics. Having that freedom was nice, but this next iteration will have better specified boundaries. By dropping a lens over this column, I can provide a clearer focus on what it is readers can expect.

Continue reading The Haul: February 2017

Freeze Frame 1/13/2017

From Wonder Woman #14 by Nicola Scott & Romulo Farjado Jr
From Wonder Woman #14 by Nicola Scott & Romulo Farjado Jr

Continue reading Freeze Frame 1/13/2017

This Week’s Finest: Southern Bastards #16

southern-bastards-16-jason-latour
Jason Latour

By Jason Aaron & Jason Latour

How does the saying go? Once your good name is lost, there is nothing that can bring it back? Coach Euless Boss has long been a man to be reckoned with in Craw County, an imposing figure unwilling to shy away from violence. Indeed, he has been more than willing to bloody his hands in a very vicious and public manner, as readers discovered at the conclusion of Southern Bastards’ initial arc. Such brutal demonstrations, though, did little to soil his public image. Coach Boss was a man to be feared and respected both in and outside the county. As the head of Craw County’s Runnin’ Rebs high school football team, he was a living legend. His name stood for something noble. The problem with such glory is that it can be intoxicating and quite blinding. Under its influence, judgements have been known to cloud. From there it only takes a single poor decision to irreparably tarnish your stature, as Jason Aaron and Jason Latour compelling illustrate in the latest installment of Southern Bastards.

Continue reading This Week’s Finest: Southern Bastards #16

Freeze Frame 11/4/2016

From Moon Knight #8 Francesco Francavilla, James Stokoe, WIlfredo Torres & Michael Garland
From Moon Knight #8 by Francesco Francavilla, James Stokoe, WIlfredo Torres & Michael Garland

Continue reading Freeze Frame 11/4/2016

Freeze Frame 5/13/2016

From Abe Sapien #33 by Fiumara & Dave Stewart
From Abe Sapien #33 by Fiumara & Dave Stewart

Continue reading Freeze Frame 5/13/2016

Freeze Frame 1/29/2016

From Old Man Logan #1 by Andrea Sorrentino & Marcelo Matolo
From Old Man Logan #1 by Andrea Sorrentino & Marcelo Matolo

Continue reading Freeze Frame 1/29/2016

This Year’s Finest 2015: Southern Bastards Got Something To Say

tumblr_neby2fmTRP1rbppffo1_500In the beginning of the series, Southern Bastards felt like a very straight forward crime story. A very good, straight forward crime story, but a straight forward crime story none the less. Yet in the final issue of the comics first arc; creators Jason Aaron & Jason Latour completely upended expectations in the books conclusion and from there, it felt like anything could happen. Aaron & Latour made good on that implication into the series second and third arcs as the comics scope continued to expand exponentially. Southern Bastards is still a book about organized crime and high school football in a small Alabama town, but it’s gone in deep on exploring the minutia of it’s setting and peoples history. It’s not just about organized crime and high school football in a small town, it’s about the who, what and why of organized crime and high school football in a small town. It’s about all the different people that make it possible, about their differences and similarities, about how their shared history makes for an engrossing saga about greed, power and community. Because of that, Southern Bastards has become the best ongoing comics series of the last twelve months; everything about the book defies expectations but it does so with a level of craft and singularity that in unmatched. Continue reading This Year’s Finest 2015: Southern Bastards Got Something To Say