Tag Archives: Wonder Woman

Freeze Frame 7/21/2017

From Dept.H #16 by Matt Kindt & Sharlene Kindt

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Freeze Frame 7/14/2017

From Dark Days The Casting #1 by John Romita Jr, Klaus Janson, Alex Sinclair & Jeremiah Skipper

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Freeze Frame 6/30/2017

From Kamandi Challenge #6 by Phillip Tan, Norm Rampund & Dean White

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Freeze Frame 6/23/2017

From The Old Gaurd #5 by Leandro Fernandez & Daniela Miwa

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Freeze Frame 6/16/2017

From Gotham Academy Second Semester #10 by Adam Archer, Sandra Hope & Msasyk

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Teaser for Professor Marston & the Wonder Women

Well, it was probably inevitable that Annapurna Pictures would want to ride the coattails of Wonder Wonder‘s current popularity to promote the inevitable William Moulton Marston biopic. The film will use Marston’s unconventional domestic arrangements as a lens for exploring the creation of his famous heroine. Will the biopic be the rare insightful examination of a complex personality or the all more common disposable, superficial recitation of facts and character impersonation? Who knows? But, hey, here’s a vague teaser:

Professor Marston & the Wonder Women stars Luke Evans, Rebecca Hall & Bella Heathcote. It is written and directed by Angela Robinson. Annapurna Pictures will release it at some undisclosed date (presumably fall’s Oscar season, if the test audiences like it enough).

Cheers.

Review of Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman poster

No Spoilers

Tents pole movies always come with astronomical expectations. Fans are hoping for the most amazing film they have ever seen (until, at least, the next installment) while studio executives are hoping to be awash in cash. Critics, depending on how they stride the pop culture divide, are either sharpening their knives or readily willing to suspend disbelief. As box office attendance continues to decline, the stakes have only increased. The continuing lackluster performance of Aliens: Covenant has many analysts wondering who assumed there was any pent-up demand for a sixth helping of silver screen Xenomorphs. Into this contentious atmosphere Wonder Woman arrives with even weightier expectations. It is the first superhero film directed by a woman. It is the first solo female superhero film since the genre’s resurgence a decade ago, and not just any superheroine at that. Wonder Woman has been, from her inception, a feminist icon; how she would be portrayed on screen would be critiqued in circles far removed from fandom, especially in the current social environment. Meanwhile, back in their beach bungalows, the suits have their own concerns. After last year’s critical takedowns of Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad, Warner Brothers desperately needs a little respectability for their superhero universe. Yes, both those films made a lot of money, while the latter somehow won an Oscar, but perception is important. In the cliché parlance of the day, they want a narrative reset for the DC Cinematic Universe. And so, Diana arrived in theaters on Friday with an unreasonable amount of baggage. The good news is that the movie easily proves itself more limber than anything else the DCCU has offered up so far. Despite its flaws, it is an entertaining experience.

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